1. A boost from Boston in Rwanda’s cancer fight

    Butaro Hospital, the first cancer ward in rural East Africa, opened last week with a big helping of Boston medical know-how.

    (PARTNERS IN HEALTH)

     
  2. Mass. General named best hospital in US

    Massachusetts General Hospital leaped past Johns Hopkins Hospital to take the top spot in US News and World Report’s annual rankings for the first time.

    (PAT GREENHOUSE/GLOBE STAFF/FILE 2004)

     
  3. Brigham implants first total artificial heart in New England

    Surgeons at Brigham and Women’s Hospital implanted the heart in a 66-year-old former teacher from the South Shore.

    (JONATHAN WIGGS/GLOBE STAFF)

     
  4. As records go online, clash over mental care privacy

    Patients, hospitals, and doctors are wrestling with privacy issues as providers in separate networks are preparing to share records more widely online.

     
  5. OPINION | MAKING HEALTH CARE AFFORDABLE

    In Elinor Ostrom’s legacy, a lesson for Beacon Hill

    The work of the Nobel Prize-winning economist, who died last week, should inspire the state as it looks for ways to rein in health care costs, writes former Medicare chief Donald M. Berwick.

    (AP FILE/2009)

     
  6. Patients driving direction of new drug research

    Patients and their families are working with pharmaceutical companies, matching patients with clinical trials, paying for research, and lobbying to speed drug development.

     
  7. The architects of a new kind of health care

    The young architects behind MASS Design are bringing their philosophy to health-care projects around the world, from Rwanda and Uganda to Haiti and back home.

    (SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF)

     
  8. Healthy doses of respect in medicine

    Dr. Lucian Leape, a founder of the national patient safety movement, recently published two papers about respect in medicine.

     
  9. Spine-injured rats walk in experiment

    - Many scientists are working on treatments to help people with spinal cord injuries walk. Now there’s a striking new demonstration of how one approach might work: Spinal nerve stimulation helped rats walk and climb stairs.

     
  10. EDITORIAL

    Helium shortage is no laughing matter

    - The US faces a shortage of helium - useful in a range of applications, including medicine - because of a hamfisted 1996 law.

     
  11. Helping doctors put empathy to good use

    - Dr. Helen Riess recently published a study showing that explicitly teaching empathy to doctors-in-training improves their interactions with patients.

    (EVAN MCGLINN FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE)

     
  12. Medical care shifting to electronic data files

    - Electronic health records are being used in hospitals and doctors’ offices. So how are they doing? Do the e-records protect and promote patient safety?

     
  13. Obesity rates down for infants, toddlers in Mass.

    - After a three-decade tripling in childhood obesity rates, the trend has leveled off and, for the first time, appears to be on a decline among infants and preschoolers, according to a study.

     
  14. DAILY DOSE

    Are you leading a heart-healthy lifestyle?

    - Negative emotions like anger, anxiety, and depression have long been associated with heart disease, but what about the flip side? Can positive emotions like optimism, life satisfaction, and a sense of well-being actually lower your risk of having a heart attack or stroke?

     
  15. Brain surgery that’s not invasive

    - An experimental procedure pioneered in Boston, called MRI-guided focused ultrasound, uses 1,000 otherwise-harmless ultrasound beams to zap tumors.