TO GRAMMAR’S HOUSE
Identification, please 
From “front-runner” to “casino mogul,” editors must be careful when applying identifying words and phrases to people.
(ISTOCK)

TO GRAMMAR’S HOUSE

Identification, please

From “front-runner” to “casino mogul,” editors must be careful when applying identifying words and phrases to people.

(ISTOCK)

TO GRAMMAR’S HOUSE
Yesterday’s gone 
- For what seemed like forever, copy editors embraced the routine task of changing the days of the week in stories to “yesterday,” “today,” and “tomorrow.”

TO GRAMMAR’S HOUSE

Yesterday’s gone

- For what seemed like forever, copy editors embraced the routine task of changing the days of the week in stories to “yesterday,” “today,” and “tomorrow.”

The overuse of exclamation points! 
- E-mails and text messages have pushed the exclamation epidemic to a dire point. There’s now a name for it – the very unpleasant slang “bangorrhea.”

The overuse of exclamation points!

- E-mails and text messages have pushed the exclamation epidemic to a dire point. There’s now a name for it – the very unpleasant slang “bangorrhea.”

GLOBE INSIDERS | TO GRAMMAR’S HOUSE
Clanging off the rim
- Should headline writers give in to the temptation of terms like “Linsanity”? Or should they stick with words that actually exist?

GLOBE INSIDERS | TO GRAMMAR’S HOUSE

Clanging off the rim

- Should headline writers give in to the temptation of terms like “Linsanity”? Or should they stick with words that actually exist?

TO GRAMMAR’S HOUSE
Bias is a four-letter word
- Like Tim Thomas, copy editors are the goalies of the newsroom. Nothing should get by them, including bias, even if unintentional.

TO GRAMMAR’S HOUSE

Bias is a four-letter word

- Like Tim Thomas, copy editors are the goalies of the newsroom. Nothing should get by them, including bias, even if unintentional.