Local CSAs offer meat, fish, eggs, and chickens 
A growing number of Community Supported Agriculture providers are selling shares for the protein portion of the plate.
(MATTHEW CAVANAUGH FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE)

Local CSAs offer meat, fish, eggs, and chickens

A growing number of Community Supported Agriculture providers are selling shares for the protein portion of the plate.

(MATTHEW CAVANAUGH FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE)

Farmers put focus on retailing 
- Agriculture’s new retail-oriented entrepreneurs are finding success by becoming more diverse - offering everything from baby lettuces to farm tours.

Farmers put focus on retailing

- Agriculture’s new retail-oriented entrepreneurs are finding success by becoming more diverse - offering everything from baby lettuces to farm tours.

For locavores: Farms deliver fresh food directly to the city 
- Bostonians have been buying local farm food ever since horse-drawn wagons set up shop at Haymarket in the 1830s. Now, in a more modern approach, some businesses are delivering produce and meats from New England orchards and farms directly to the homes of city dwellers.

For locavores: Farms deliver fresh food directly to the city

- Bostonians have been buying local farm food ever since horse-drawn wagons set up shop at Haymarket in the 1830s. Now, in a more modern approach, some businesses are delivering produce and meats from New England orchards and farms directly to the homes of city dwellers.

OPINION: The locavore’s dilemma
- ALL THAT is grassy is not green. There are many good reasons to like local  food, but any large-scale metropolitan farming will do more harm than good to  the environment. Devoting scarce metropolitan land to agriculture means lower  density levels, longer drives, and carbon emission increases which easily offset  the modest greenhouse gas reductions associated with shipping less food.
(The Boston Globe/Istockphoto;Heather Hopp-Bruce/Globe Staff Illustration)

OPINION: The locavore’s dilemma

- ALL THAT is grassy is not green. There are many good reasons to like local food, but any large-scale metropolitan farming will do more harm than good to the environment. Devoting scarce metropolitan land to agriculture means lower density levels, longer drives, and carbon emission increases which easily offset the modest greenhouse gas reductions associated with shipping less food.

(The Boston Globe/Istockphoto;Heather Hopp-Bruce/Globe Staff Illustration)

"We have to remind them that the egg is still in the chicken."

From a Boston Globe interview with egg farmer Neil Couveé. 
Farms and food and innovative human energy sustain a town’s revival
- HARDWICK, Vt. — If there were a “Locavore Capital of America” one would expect it to be in sunny California or perhaps somewhere in the heartland, where the topsoil is measured in feet, not inches, say in a town with a name like Farmersburg, Iowa, or Black Earth, Wis., both real places.

Farms and food and innovative human energy sustain a town’s revival

- HARDWICK, Vt. — If there were a “Locavore Capital of America” one would expect it to be in sunny California or perhaps somewhere in the heartland, where the topsoil is measured in feet, not inches, say in a town with a name like Farmersburg, Iowa, or Black Earth, Wis., both real places.