1. EDITORIAL

    Internet-style justice for boys who bullied bus monitor

    The outpouring of support for Karen Klein points to the general goodness of humanity, even behind the often impersonal filter of the Internet.

    (STEVEN SENNE/ASSOCIATED PRESS)

     
  2. Mass. stalled antibullying guide under Romney

    Former governor Mitt Romney’s administration blocked publication of a guide for public schools because officials objected to use of the terms “bisexual” and “transgender.”

    (AP/FILE)

     
  3. Ex-Rutgers student gets 30 days in jail in webcam case

    - Dharun Ravi had been convicted of bias intimidation for using a webcam to watch his roommate kiss a man days before the roommate committed suicide.

    (MEL EVANS/AP FILE)

     
  4. Schoolmates: Romney bullied presumed gay student in ’60s

    - The Washington Post reports that as a high school senior, Mitt Romney allegedly led a posse that bullied and forcibly cut the hair of a student.

     
  5. EDITORIAL

    'Bully': A must-see for teens, now at PG-13 

    - “Bully” may be better experienced as a family night out. There will be plenty to talk about afterwards.

     
  6. Students collaborate on bullying issues

    - Saturdays for Success, a new Boston public schools initiative, creates a safe space for students to discuss issues tied to bullying, and includes bullies, those who have been bullied, and bystanders.

     
  7. Phoebe Prince’s mother lashes out at daughter’s tormentor

    - The mother of Phoebe Prince, the 15-year-old Irish immigrant who killed herself after being bullied by classmates, lashed out today at one of her daughter’s tormentors and described her grief as an “unbelievable pain” that will never subside.

     

  8. IPSWICH — The e-mail appeared to be from Ipswich High School Junior Class officers and was direct and to the point: It listed the names, ages, body types, and sexual experience level of 22 female Ipswich High School students who had yet to be asked to the school’s junior prom. 

     

  9. "A new wave of research into bullying’s effects, however, is now suggesting something more than that — that in fact, bullying can leave an indelible imprint on a teen’s brain at a time when it is still growing and developing."