Raising a stink over rare flower 
Morticia, better known as the Franklin Park Zoo’s "corpse flower," is now in full bloom, making it quite a sight — and a smell — to behold. The amorphophallus titanum, whch gives off an odor similar to rotting flesh, is available for viewing (and smelling) at the zoo’s greenhouse.
(Franklin Park Zoo)

Raising a stink over rare flower

Morticia, better known as the Franklin Park Zoo’s "corpse flower," is now in full bloom, making it quite a sight — and a smell — to behold. The amorphophallus titanum, whch gives off an odor similar to rotting flesh, is available for viewing (and smelling) at the zoo’s greenhouse.

(Franklin Park Zoo)

IDEAS
The long, strange quest to detect plant consciousness 
Charles Darwin and L. Ron Hubbard have something in common: they wanted to know what was going on between the leaves. 
(ISTOCKPHOTO/GLOBE STAFF ILLUSTRATIONS)

IDEAS

The long, strange quest to detect plant consciousness

Charles Darwin and L. Ron Hubbard have something in common: they wanted to know what was going on between the leaves.

(ISTOCKPHOTO/GLOBE STAFF ILLUSTRATIONS)

Curiosity for Franklin Park Zoo’s ‘corpse flower’ 
When the rare, 4-foot-6-inch plant affectionately known as Morticia finally blooms, the flower will emit an odor of rotting flesh.

Curiosity for Franklin Park Zoo’s ‘corpse flower’

When the rare, 4-foot-6-inch plant affectionately known as Morticia finally blooms, the flower will emit an odor of rotting flesh.